Should you use Wikipedia for medical information?

Should you use Wikipedia for medical information?

No, pal. Let me explain:
even though Wikipedia is one of the Webs most popular reference sites,
it is not a credible resource because anyone is allowed to be a contributor to
the project.

Wikipedia Academic has posted an article explaining everething here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Academic_use

Below is the article:

Wikipedia is increasingly used by people in the academic
community, from first-year students to professors, as the easiest source of
information about anything and everything. However, citation of Wikipedia in
research papers may not be considered acceptable, because Wikipedia is not a
creditable source.

This can be avoided by following two simple rules:

  • Do your research assignment properly. Remember that any
    encyclopedia is a starting point for research, not an ending point.
  • An encyclopedia is great for getting a general understanding of a
    subject before you dive into it. But then you do have to dive into your subject,
    using books and articles and other appropriate sources. What you find in your
    other sources will be more detailed, more precise, and more carefully reasoned
    than the summary you found in an encyclopedia. The sources you cite in your
    paper will be the more detailed sources you have used. All you need to do with
    Wikipedia, then, is thank it in your heart.

An encyclopedia is great for checking little details.
Little details may be:

  • General knowledge that you have forgotten, like the starting date
    of the

    First World War
    or the boiling point of

mercury. In that case, you should recognize the information once you find
it, and know it’s right. Citation is not needed for things that are general
knowledge.

  • A somewhat obscure point, like the population of

    Ghana
    . If this matters for your assignment, you should verify the
    information using a tried and tested source, such as the

    CIA World Factbook
    .
  • A very obscure point, such as the names of the founders of the

Social Democrat Hunchakian Party. This may be almost impossible to find
anywhere other than Wikipedia, unless you read

Armenian
, which you probably don’t, or are prepared to spend an hour in the
library, which you probably don’t want to. In this case, you should rely on–and
cite–Wikipedia.

Use your judgment. Remember that all sources have to be

evaluated
.

  • If your professor has assigned you an article or a chapter, that
    means your professor thinks it is basically OK. Do you trust your professor?
    That’s usually enough.
  • If a book is in your university library or published by a
    reputable

    university press
    , or if an article is in a standard

    academic journal
    , that means that several professors at some point thought
    it was basically OK. But time may have passed, and the book or article may now
    be out of date.
  • If your source is a website, it may be great or it may be awful.
  • A Wikipedia article may be as good as (or better than!) an article
    assigned to you by your professor, or it may contain inaccurate information and
    eccentric judgments. It is unlikely to be as bad as the worst sort of website.
    You have to judge.

Progressively Wikipedia data will be referenced with scholarly references. Ideally when you see a reality in Wikipedia you will have the option to rapidly confirm it with an on the web, scholarly source, which you can refer to rather than Wikipedia.

5 Iconic Holiday Cookies Made Healthier

You may be asking who in their right mind would want to make a cookie healthier? True; it’s a treat, a splurge, an immutable indulgence. However, healthier doesn’t necessarily mean lower in fat or calories or less delicious. It means using wholesome, natural, unrefined foods to create natural treats that work for multiple dietary styles. We’re going to be ditching the refined sweeteners, artificial food colorings, and traditional flours in this list! Whether you enjoy wheat and dairy, avoid grains, or practice veganism, there is a cookie for just about everyone! Santa is going to be very pleased…

Gingerbread people illustration for the recipe

1. Gingerbread people.

Is it possible to be too festive? Absolutely not. Not only is this a grain-free, dairy-free, refined sugar-free recipe for gingerbread men/houses, but the woman behind the recipe at Fed and Fit has also included a recipe for all-natural, fruit- based gumdrops! Talk about the perfect balance between healthy and festive! This gingerbread recipe uses almond meal as a base, so it’s great for those avoiding grains. Quality gelatin can be really beneficial to your joints, so don’t be afraid of giving it a try!

Paleo Gingerbread Cookies:

  • 3 cups almond flour
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp cloves
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ cup blackstrap molasses, warmed slightly
  • 2 Tbs maple syrup
  • 2 Tbs extra virgin coconut oil, melted
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup arrowroot flour {for rolling out dough}

Gluten-Free All-Natural Royal Icing:

  • 6 Tbs cage-free egg whites
  • 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 cups sifted powdered sugar

Paleo Gingerbread Cookies Instructions:

1. Whisk all dry ingredients together and in a separate bowl, whisk all the wet. Add the wet to the dry and stir until evenly combined. Wrap in plastic wrap or parchment paper and set in refrigerator to cool and harden for either 4 hours or overnight.

2. On a large piece of parchment paper well dusted with arrowroot flour, start rolling out the dough until it’s ¼” thick. Carefully place on parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Resize with stencils on baking sheet if necessary.

3. Bake at 350 F for 15 minutes. Let cool completely on baking sheet before moving. When cooled, transfer to a wire baking rack to cool and firm overnight.

Gluten-Free All-Natural Royal Icing:

1. On high speed, whisk the egg whites and lemon juice together until they form a thick foam. On low speed, carefully add spoonfuls of the 3 cups of powdered sugar until all is combined. Turn speed up to high and whisk for 6 minutes.

2. Transfer to piping bag, color in bowls, or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to three days

2. Molasses cookies.

As the only wheat-containing recipe in this list, it is by no means less healthy — unless you cannot eat wheat, of course. With organic whole-wheat pastry flour, grass-fed butter, raw honey, and pastured eggs, there is nothing to feel guilty about when enjoying this subtly sweet, earthy cookie.

Ingredients:
2 cups all-purpose flour, measure after sifting
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 1/4 cups butter, at room temperature, (2 1/2 sticks)
1 cup dark brown sugar, firmly packed
1 large egg
1/4 cup molasses


Preparation:
Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or Silpat sheets.
Combine the first 6 ingredients, mixing to thorouthly blend.
Add the remaining ingredients; beat with electric mixer for 2 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl a few times.
Wrap the dough in waxed paper and chill for 1 hour.
Preheat oven to 350° with the rack in the center position.
Roll the chilled dough into 1-inch balls and place 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheet.
Bake until the tops are set, 12 to 15 minutes.
Cool on wire racks.

Coconut snowballs illustration for the recipe

3. Coconut snowballs

Vegan and easily adjusted to be 100% raw, these cookies can be enjoyed by most. No nuts, wheat, eggs, dairy, or refined sugar in these balls of delight. It just goes to show that tasty bites of holiday joy come in all flavors and dietary styles!

Ingredients

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened 1/2 cup powdered sugar 1 teaspoon pure coconut extract or vanilla extract 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Parchment paper 4 ounces white chocolate, chopped and melted according to package directions Garnish: shaved coconut

4. Chocolate Chip Cookies.

Ingredients

Makes 12 cookies

200 g (2 cups /7 oz) organic rolled oats
50 g (1 ¾ oz) flaked or desiccated coconut
60 g (2 oz) macadamia nut oil or your choice cold pressed coconut oil or melted butter
60 g (2 oz) raw honey, organic maple syrup or rice syrup
1 organic egg
100 g (3 ½ oz) block good quality 70% dark chocolate (see notes)

Preheat your oven to 150°C / 300*F.
Combine oats, coconut, oil or melted butter, honey and egg into a mixing bowl.
Mix through with your hands for a few minutes – squishing the ingredients together until the cookie starts to come together.
I often like to rest the mixture for 5 minutes after mixing – so the oats soften a little more and hold together when squished.
Chop up the chocolate with a large knife.
Add chocolate to the oats and mix through.
Form into 12 cookies… I love using a small ice cream scoop for this – so easy that way.
Place onto a lined baking tray and flatten slightly.
Bake for approx 20 minutes or until golden. Check half way through the cooking… they are delicate so you need to watch them.
Remove from the oven and cool completely. Enjoy.

5. Sugar-Free Chocolate

Ingredients

Serves 20 small portions
120g (4 oz/1/2 cup) cacao butter or cold-pressed coconut oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 tablespoons rice malt syrup or alternatively raw honey or maple syrup. (optional)
110 g (4 oz / 1/2 cup) almond butter, peanut butter, hazelnut butter, cashew butter or tahini
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
120 g (4 oz / 1 cup) Naked Chocolate (for this recipe I used Healthy Chef Naked Chocolat Mylk)

Melt cacao butter or coconut oil in a large bowl set over a pot of simmering water.
Remove the bowl from the heat and add Naked Chocolate and mix through using a small whisk until smooth.
Add nut butter and a pinch of sea salt then mix through. Taste your chocolate creation….you may find you don’t need to add any sweetener whatsoever. If you do, just add 1 tablespoon at a time.
Pour chocolate into a small glass container lined with non-stick baking paper or cling film.
Refrigerate for 4 hours or until set.
Cut into bite-size pieces and enjoy.
Store in the fridge, covered for up to 4 weeks.

Know The Best Way To Quit Smoking

You can quit smoking infinitely if you put your trust in God to help you be successful. Most people try to quit smoking through other means like pills, hypnosis, patch, or psychiatry without much success. These people do not recognize that the best way to quit smoking is through faith in the Lord. Through trusting God, you can break this habit for good and at no cost to you.
Consider how many people you have met who have quit smoking, and the different techniques that they used. How long did they stay non-smokers? Which techniques brought back the highest success rate of permanent non-smokers?
Amazingly, you will find that people who trust in God stay non-smokers forever. The people who used pills, hypnosis, patch, or some other means eventually went back to smoking after a while.
Why is it that people who use the power of the Lord are more successful in kicking this nasty habit? Is it because they have more will power than those who use other techniques? I think not. Most likely, it is because faith is a powerful tool. Through faith, people are able to do amazing things.
So, how do you use faith in God to help you quit smoking? The first thing you need to do is pray. Pray to God and ask for his help. Give your addiction completely over to God and know he will help you every step of the way. Have complete faith that God helps those who turn to him in their time of need.
Next, do not give up. Do not doubt that God will help you. No matter what obstacles are thrown your way, hold onto your faith. Keep praying to God and asking for his help. By not giving up, you are showing God that you trust him completely.
When you are no longer a smoker, you need to do is become a witness for God. Spread the news on how you used the power of faith alone to stop this addition. Tell people how it is the best way to quit smoking.

If your want to learn more about side effects of quitting smoking, visit tips to stop smoking.

US Tells Ankara Iran-Sanctions-Case Suspect In ‘Good Health’

Deputy Prime Minister Bekir Bozdag says Washington has told Ankara that jailed Turkish-Iranian businessman Reza Zarrab — a gold trader who is awaiting trial in the United States on charges of evading U.S. sanctions against Iran — is in good medical condition.

Bozdag made the remarks on November 16, a day after Turkey announced it had sent a diplomatic note to U.S. authorities inquiring about Zarrab.

Photo by Faruk Melik ÇEVİK

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons website last week listed Zarrab, 34, as having been released from prison on November 8. But U.S. prosecutors said that posting was an error and he remained in jail.

Turkish leaders have pressed repeatedly for the release of Zarrab, who has close ties to the government of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Erdogan and other Turkish leaders have raised the issue directly with the White House.

Media reports last week said U.S. special prosecutor Robert Mueller is investigating whether Turkish officials discussed paying former national security adviser Michael Flynn $15 million to secure Zarrab’s release and to allow the deportation of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric residing in the United States who Erdogan accuses of engineering Turkey’s failed July 2016 coup.

Zarrab, taken into U.S. custody in March 2016, has hired former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani to negotiate with U.S. authorities to try to obtain his release through political and diplomatic channels.

A spokesman for acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim in Manhattan confirmed on November 14 that Zarrab remained in federal custody in the United States.

“The information that Zarrab was released is not factual,” Zarrab’s lawyer Seyda Yildirim told Turkey’s Hurriyet newspaper on November 15.

“He might have been moved to a different section. We haven’t been informed in five days,” Yildirim said.

Hurriyet quoted a diplomatic source as saying that Turkey, in its formal diplomatic note, had asked U.S. authorities to make clear where Zarrab was being held and to give assurances about his health and security.

Zarrab has pleaded not guilty to the Iran sanctions evasion charges against him and a co-defendant, Mehmet Hakan Atilla, an executive at the Turkish lender Halkbank. Their trial is due start in New York on November 27.

Erdogan has accused U.S. prosecutors of having “ulterior motives” in the case by including references to him and his wife in court papers.

Zarrab, a wealthy businessman who is married to a well-known Turkish pop singer, was linked to a corruption scandal that swirled around Erdogan and his deputies when Erdogan was Turkish prime minister in 2013.

Zarrab spent 70 days in custody in Turkey at the time, but all suspects arrested in the judicial probe were subsequently released. Erdogan at the time denounced the allegations as a plot by Gulen to bring down his government.

With reporting by AP, AFP, and Reuters