Category Archive : Healthy living

Healthy Living: Concussions in Youth Sports

A concussion is a brain injury; the only known cure for brain injury is prevention. While helmets can protect against skull fractures and more serious brain injuries, they cannot prevent a concussion; therefore, it is vitally important to be well-informed about how to prevent a concussion.

Experts agree that the best ways to prevent concussion are to play by the rules and teaching young athletes to respect the rules of their sport is part of good coaching.

Photo by Keith Johnston

Most concussions resolve with rest within a week to ten days; however, about 10% of concussions take longer to heal and some may have long-term consequences. Many concussions go unreported; an accurate concussion history for an individual typically is not available and experts warn that there is a risk of serious injury when multiple concussions are sustained over time. The risk of second impact syndrome is real and a matter of life and death or long-term severe disability. For all of these reasons it is extremely important that everyone involved in youth sports and recreation understands how to recognize the signs and symptoms of concussion, and knows what to do if a concussion is suspected both on the field and off.

There are a variety of ways to become informed and up-to-date on current concussion issues. When the New Jersey Concussion Law was passed in December 2010 it mandated that each year every student athlete and their parents/guardians receive a fact sheet. The fact sheets must be signed and returned by students and parents/guardians or the student is not permitted to participate in school sports.

Photo by John Torcasio

Return to play

Subsequent to written medical clearance stating that the student-athlete is asymptomatic at rest the Model Policy states that the graduated return-to-play protocol is initiated and supervised by a certified athletic trainer or school/team physician or, if not available, a regular physician or licensed health care provider trained in the evaluation and management of concussion. If symptoms re-occur during any step in the graduated return-to-play process the student athlete will return to the previous level on the following day.

Graduated return-to-play Protocol:

  1. Complete one full day of normal cognitive activities without any re-emergence of symptoms. If no symptoms appear move to step 2 the following day.
  2. Light aerobic exercise. If no symptoms appear move to step 3 on the following day.
  3. Sport specific exercise – no head impact activities. If no symptoms appear move to step 4 on the following day.
  4. Non-contact training drills: progressive resistance training. If no symptoms appear move to step 5 on the following day.
  5. Full-contact practice and participation in normal training activities. In the Model Policy step 5 is initiated FOLLOWING MEDICAL CLEARANCE (This can be a verbal consultation with the student’s physician). If no symptoms appear move to step 6 on the following day.
  6. Return to play involving normal exertion or game activity.


Notes:
Cognitive activities encompass any activity where thought is involved. They include, but are not limited to: attending a full day of school, studying, watching practice, interacting with peers.

The student should continue to proceed to the next level if asymptomatic at the current level. Generally, each step should take 24 hours so that an athlete would take approximately 1 week to complete the protocol when symptoms do not re-occur. If any symptoms re-occur during the protocol, the student returns to the previous step after an additional 24 hours of rest and progresses accordingly.

Healthy Living – Ways to keep your skin safe in the sun

God gave you just one skin and it must last you a lifetime. It is the largest organ of the body and it protects you from the external environment. Your skin deserves to be cared for and needs protection from the sun and it’s harmful rays.

Many believe that getting a base tan before going on a vacation to a warm sunny climate, like Florida, will protect them from getting a sunburn and prevent sun damage to their skin. This is a myth. “A tan is not protective. If you have a tan, you have injured your skin – you have sun damage,” according to Jeffery Peterson,MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Washington University School of Medicine.

Photo by Tomas Salas

In fact, a tan is actually a sign of skin damage and is your body’s way of trying to protect it’s skin from more harmful UV rays. This is not very effective because certain UV rays get through the tan and damage deep layers of your skin every time your skin is exposed to the sun. Even after the tan fades the damage remains below the skin’s surface, where the UV radiation has penetrated and begun to permanently alter your DNA. Each time you are in the sun and getting tan the effects of the UV radiation build and over time accumulate to increase your risk of getting skin cancer. It also makes your skin look old before it’s time, causing wrinkling, age spots, scaly patches, and uneven skin tone.

Indoor tanning is not safe either, even though claims are made that it is harmless and actually healthy. Indoor tanning devices all emit ultraviolet (UV) light. A tan develops as a response to that UV radiation exposure. It causes damage to the DNA that may lead to skin cancer. The more exposure that occurs the higher the risk of skin cancer on down the line.

UV radiation seems to cause all three kinds of common skin cancer – basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. There are three mechanisms in it’s inducing of skin cancer: First, UV light directly damages one’s DNA leading to mutations; second, it produces activated oxygen molecules that can damage DNA and other cellular structures; and third, it leads to localized immunosuppression that blocks one’s own natural anti-cancer defenses.

The Skin Cancer Foundation has recommended the SPF sunscreen products as an effective aid in the prevention of UVA and UVB sunburn and the premature aging of skin. Many a dermatologist (skin doctor) will tell you that if you are outdoors at all without sun protection on that you are risking looking old before your time with dried winkled skin and age spots. Not only that, but you are at risk for developing skin cancer including malignant melanoma, a deadly cancer whose incidence is increasing faster in the 20-35 age group than any other cancer. So be sure to protect yourself and keep your skin looking young and smooth by the daily use of sun protection products.

Mediterranean vs Palaeolithic: a diet of research to feed good health

Variety and moderation of a food pyramid are the foundation of balanced nutrition, “basis” for adequate nutrition.

The next step in food pyramid, is placed high protein foods (milk, cheese, fish, meat or meat products with a low fat content), white meats are recommended in preference to the red. Top of the pyramid is occupied by fat and sugary foods, with the recommendation that they are rarely eaten in small quantities.

If people can not eat a certain group (vegetarians), they must ensure that their part of the same nutrients, but other products (fruit juice with calcium, calcium provided cereals fortified with calcium, iron, spinach, beans, lentils, peas).

In addition, the food pyramid must be supplemented with physical activity. Evidence indicates that regular physical activity reduces the risk of chronic diseases like hypertension, stroke, ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, colon cancer and osteoporosis. 30 minutes of exercise a day is sufficient to reduce the risk of these diseases.

Photo by Bewakoof.com Official

A balanced diet means a diet that contains adequate proportions necessary nutrients our body health. Our body contains about 60% water, 16% protein, 10-25% fat (15-30% in women), 5% minerals, 1% carbohydrate.
For good diet we need a high intake of certain foods. These are called macro nutrients and include: carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Also we need a smaller amount of other foods, they are micro nutrients and include vitamins and minerals. An important part of a balanced diet is the fiber and water. Water is necessary for all reactions in the body. We need about 1.5 liters of water per day.
As many foods that contain several types of nutritional elements still difficult to achieve a balanced diet. Food Pyramid was created to teach you what types of foods and how much can be consumed.
Thus, food located at the bottom should be consumed in greater quantities than the tip. As you climb the pyramid, less of the foods can be consumed.

Group 1 – fats, oils and sweets

These foods are placed at the top because they have not eaten too often. This group includes butter, fats of any kind, biscuits, sweets, cakes, sugar and sweet drinks. Fats from nuts, or seeds are unsaturated fats are healthier than saturated ones found in dairy products and meat. Group 1 foods should be eaten in small quantities.

Group 2 – meat

Group 2 includes red meat, chicken, fish, nuts, seeds, soy products, hamburger. These foods have a high content of protein, fiber, vitamin E and B6, minerals like calcium, iron or zinc. Acetate can be served food 2-3 times a day.

Group 3 – milk and milk products

Dairy products contain high amounts of calcium are the healthiest fat products are consumed and 2-4 times per day. Examples of dairy products: cheese, milk, margarine, yogurt, etc..

Group 4 – fruit

This group includes fresh or canned fruit. Fruits are rich in vitamins, the most common being vitamin C. The fruits also contain vitamin A. Canned and syrups are not as healthy because they have a high content of sugar and therefore calories. Fresh fruits are low in calories and fat and are recommended to be consumed 2-4 times per day.

Group 5 – Vegetables

This group includes all vegetables. Contains foods that are low in fat but rich in vitamins and fiber. Some vitamins are destroyed by cooking. This group needed 3-5 snacks per day.

Photo by Louis Hansel

Group 6 – foods with high starch

This group includes bread, cereal, rice, pasta, potatoes and is at the bottom. This group has consumed more food than other groups of the pyramid. Approximately one third of the daily diet of foods must be represented in this group. Foods in this group contain more starch and carbohydrates are important for the body to provide energy. May also contain minerals, vitamins of group B and fiber. Highly processed carbohydrates like white bread is not very healthy.

How to make sure that my diet is balanced?

Studies in Britain have shown that most adolescents eat too much fat and too little fiber. Daily diet can become healthy if:


Fat-eat food

  • Skimmed milk instead of whole milk;
  • Eat more starchy foods such as bread, cereals, potatoes, pasta and rice;
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables;
  • Eat more fiber foods such as fruits, whole grains.

A healthy lifestyle is not you with biscuits and grilled pork collars. Need a quick nutritional guide that will show you how to combine foods to keep your figure. You can find analyzing less food pyramid.

Changes are so simple you can do to improve your lifestyle and feel full of energy, that you wonder that you have not done before.

Even for Men at High Risk, Healthy Living May Help Prevent Colon Cancer

This article claims up to 75% of colon cancer can be prevented by diet. The real number is more like 90%. People get cancer primarily from the foods they eat.


One of the things this article doesn’t mention is the powerful cancer-causing effects of sodium nitrite, an ingredient added to bacon, hot dogs, and virtually all packaged meats. It forms cancer-causing nitrosamines in the body and directly contributes to colon cancer. You can help prevent colon cancer in your own body by simply avoiding all foods that contain sodium nitrite.

Photo by Jack Hunter

You have to read the labels, of course, because there are a lot of foods that contain sodium nitrite. Food manufacturers love the ingredient because it turns meats bright red and makes them look fresh.

Yet you can reduce your odds of getting colon cancer by eating the right foods. The American Institute of Cancer Research says up to 75% of cases of colon cancer could be prevented by diet. Though fat is a suspected colon cancer villain, a new British study of diet and cancer in 28 countries, including the USA, concludes that high consumers of olive oil have a lower rate of colon cancer. Corn oil and animal fat increase colon cancer in animals; fish oil doesn’t. Also harmful: trans fatty acids (the partially hydrogenated fats in some margarines, baked goods and processed foods).